April 16, 2024

Though one former member of the PGA Tour has accused Tiger Woods of using performance-enhancing substances at some point in his career, golf is one of the few sports where doing so will offer you a significant competitive advantage.

 

The training routine Tiger Woods followed to develop the power, flexibility, and endurance necessary to become one of the most dominant players to have ever set foot on a golf course contributed to his meteoric rise to fame in the second half of the 1990s.

 

His decision to play the game like a true professional athlete was a fairly revolutionary development that changed the course of the sport because many other golfers realized they had to follow suit if they wanted to play at his level. Of course, he wasn’t the first golfer to use diet and exercise to his advantage.

 

Mark Lye, a former member of the PGA Tour, seems to believe that Tiger received some unethical assistance in establishing himself as a legend.

 

Lye made his PGA Tour debut in 1977 and only managed to win one tournament during his time on the circuit. After retiring in 1995, he changed his focus to broadcasting, which coincided with the year that Woods participated in his first professional event as an amateur.

 

In response to a query about reports that Woods used steroids at some point in his career, Lye said it’s a badly kept secret on a recent episode of Don’t @ Me with Dan Dakich.

 

Individuals in Tiger’s support group advise him to “shut up about it.” No one has ever left like that.

 

That has never been spoken quite way I am saying it now. There’s simply no question. Additionally, I estimate that 80–90% of people are aware that something is wrong.

 

Previously, renowned sportswriter Michael Bamberger looked at circumstantial evidence that may have indicated Woods used performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) at some point.

 

He pointed out that although Tiger’s physique undoubtedly transformed during that time—more than ten years after he started pro—it would be absurd to argue that he couldn’t have undergone that metamorphosis without the use of drugs. The PGA Tour didn’t begin testing for steroids until 2008.

 

Because there is so little evidence, it is difficult to accept Lye’s claim, albeit some doubters will undoubtedly always exist.

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